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How Wuki Tung's Book Can Help You Learn and Apply Group Theory in Physics



Group Theory In Physics Wuki Tung Pdf 11: A Comprehensive Review




Group theory is a branch of mathematics that studies the properties and patterns of abstract structures called groups. Groups are sets of elements that can be combined by a certain operation, such as addition or multiplication, that satisfies some rules. For example, the set of integers with addition is a group, because adding any two integers gives another integer, and there are rules for how to add them.




Group Theory In Physics Wuki Tung Pdf 11



But what does group theory have to do with physics? Well, it turns out that many physical systems and phenomena can be described or understood by using groups. For instance, the symmetry of a crystal or a molecule can be represented by a group, which tells us how the object looks the same after certain transformations, such as rotations or reflections. Similarly, the laws of nature can be expressed by using groups, which tell us how physical quantities, such as energy or momentum, change under certain transformations, such as rotations or boosts.


Therefore, group theory is a powerful tool for physicists to classify, simplify, and discover physical systems and phenomena. However, learning group theory can be challenging for many students and researchers, because it involves a lot of abstract concepts and technical details. That's why having a good textbook on group theory in physics can be very helpful.


One such textbook is "Group Theory in Physics" by Wuki Tung, a professor emeritus of physics at Purdue University. His book was first published in 1985 and has been widely used as a reference and a teaching material for graduate courses on group theory in physics. His book covers the basics of group theory, the representation theory of groups, and the applications of group theory in various fields of physics, such as quantum mechanics, atomic physics, molecular physics, solid state physics, particle physics, and relativity.


In this article, we will review Wuki Tung's book "Group Theory in Physics" in detail. We will summarize the main content and structure of his book, highlight its strengths and weaknesses, compare it to other books on group theory in physics, and provide some tips and suggestions for readers who want to learn more about group theory in physics. We hope that this article will help you to appreciate the beauty and power of group theory in physics.


The Basics of Group Theory




The first part of Wuki Tung's book introduces the basic concepts and definitions of group theory. He starts with a simple example of rotational symmetry in two dimensions, and then generalizes it to the concept of a group. A group is a set of elements, such as rotations, that can be combined by a certain operation, such as composition, that satisfies four rules: closure, associativity, identity, and inverse. For example, the set of all possible rotations in two dimensions is a group, because composing any two rotations gives another rotation, and there are rules for how to compose them.


Wuki Tung then explains the concepts of subgroups, cosets, and quotient groups. A subgroup is a subset of a group that is also a group by itself. For example, the set of rotations by multiples of 90 degrees is a subgroup of the set of all rotations in two dimensions. A coset is a subset of a group that is obtained by multiplying all the elements of a subgroup by a fixed element of the group. For example, the set of rotations by multiples of 45 degrees plus 15 degrees is a coset of the subgroup of rotations by multiples of 90 degrees. A quotient group is a set of all possible cosets of a subgroup. For example, the quotient group of the subgroup of rotations by multiples of 90 degrees is the set of four cosets: 0, 90, 180, 270, 15, 105, 195, 285, 30, 120, 210, 300, and 45, 135, 225, 315.


Wuki Tung then discusses the properties and types of groups. He introduces the concepts of order, cyclic groups, abelian groups, generators, and isomorphism. The order of a group is the number of elements in the group. For example, the order of the group of rotations by multiples of 90 degrees is four. A cyclic group is a group that can be generated by a single element. For example, the group of rotations by multiples of 90 degrees can be generated by rotating by 90 degrees repeatedly. An abelian group is a group that commutes, meaning that the order of combining elements does not matter. For example, the group of rotations by multiples of 90 degrees is abelian, because rotating by 90 degrees and then by another 90 degrees gives the same result as rotating by another 90 degrees and then by 90 degrees. A generator is an element that can generate a subgroup or a group by repeated application. For example, rotating by 90 degrees is a generator of the subgroup or the group of rotations by multiples of 90 degrees. An isomorphism is a one-to-one correspondence between two groups that preserves their structure. For example, the group of rotations by multiples of 90 degrees is isomorphic to the group of integers modulo four with addition.


Wuki Tung then gives some examples of groups in physics. He shows how to use groups to describe the symmetry operations and elements of crystals and molecules. He also shows how to use groups to describe the transformations and invariants of physical quantities under rotations and translations.


The Representation Theory of Groups




of groups, such that the matrix multiplication corresponds to the group operation. For example, the matrices $$ \beginbmatrix \cos \theta & -\sin \theta \\ \sin \theta & \cos \theta \endbmatrix $$ are representations of the rotations by angle $\theta$ in two dimensions, because multiplying two such matrices gives another matrix of the same form, and the matrix multiplication corresponds to the composition of rotations. Wuki Tung then explains the concepts of equivalent representations, irreducible representations, and reducible representations. Two representations are equivalent if they are related by a similarity transformation, meaning that they have the same structure but different bases. For example, the matrices $$ \beginbmatrix 1 & 0 \\ 0 & 1 \endbmatrix, \beginbmatrix 0 & -1 \\ 1 & 0 \endbmatrix, \beginbmatrix -1 & 0 \\ 0 & -1 \endbmatrix, \beginbmatrix 0 & 1 \\ -1 & 0 \endbmatrix $$ are equivalent representations of the rotations by multiples of 90 degrees in two dimensions, because they are related by a similarity transformation. An irreducible representation is a representation that cannot be decomposed into smaller representations by a similarity transformation, meaning that it has no invariant subspaces. For example, the matrices $$ \beginbmatrix 1 & 0 \\ 0 & 1 \endbmatrix, \beginbmatrix -1 & 0 \\ 0 & -1 \endbmatrix $$ are irreducible representations of the rotations by multiples of 180 degrees in two dimensions, because they have no invariant subspaces. A reducible representation is a representation that can be decomposed into smaller representations by a similarity transformation, meaning that it has invariant subspaces. For example, the matrices $$ \beginbmatrix 1 & 0 \\ 0 & 1 \endbmatrix, \beginbmatrix -1 & 0 \\ 0 & -1 \endbmatrix, \beginbmatrix 0 & -1 \\ 1 & 0 \endbmatrix, \beginbmatrix 0 & 1 \\ -1 & 0 \endbmatrix $$ are reducible representations of the rotations by multiples of 90 degrees in two dimensions, because they have invariant subspaces. Wuki Tung then discusses the properties and types of representations. He introduces the concepts of dimension, character, orthogonality, unitarity, and completeness. The dimension of a representation is the size of the matrices that represent the group elements. For example, the dimension of the matrices that represent the rotations by multiples of 90 degrees in two dimensions is two. The character of a representation is a function that assigns a complex number to each group element, such that it is invariant under similarity transformations and equal to the trace of the corresponding matrix. For example, the character of the matrices that represent the rotations by multiples of 90 degrees in two dimensions is a function that assigns 2 to the identity element, 0 to the rotation by 180 degrees, and -2 to the rotations by 90 and 270 degrees. The orthogonality property states that the inner product of two different characters is zero. The unitarity property states that the matrices of a representation are unitary, meaning that they preserve lengths and angles. The completeness property states that any representation can be decomposed into a direct sum of irreducible representations. Wuki Tung then gives some examples of representations in physics. He shows how to use representations to describe the behavior and properties of physical systems and quantities under symmetry operations and transformations. He also shows how to use representations to classify and construct physical states and operators. The Applications of Group Theory in Physics




The third part of Wuki Tung's book introduces the applications of group theory in physics. He starts with a simple example of using group theory to solve the Schrödinger equation for a particle in a square well with rotational symmetry, and then generalizes it to various fields of physics.


Wuki Tung shows how group theory can help to classify physical systems and symmetries. He explains how to use group theory to identify and label different types of crystals and molecules according to their point groups and space groups. He also explains how to use group theory to identify and label different types of particles and fields according to their Lorentz groups and gauge groups.


Wuki Tung shows how group theory can help to simplify physical calculations and predictions. He explains how to use group theory to reduce the number of independent variables and equations in physical problems by using symmetry arguments and selection rules. He also explains how to use group theory to find the degeneracies and splittings of energy levels and spectra in physical systems by using perturbation theory and symmetry breaking.


Wuki Tung shows how group theory can help to discover new physical phenomena and principles. He explains how to use group theory to derive and generalize physical laws and conservation laws by using Noether's theorem and invariance principles. He also explains how to use group theory to propose and test new physical models and theories by using group extensions and representations.


The Highlights and Challenges of Wuki Tung's Book




The fourth part of Wuki Tung's book reviews the highlights and challenges of his book. He summarizes the main strengths and weaknesses of his book, compares it to other books on group theory in physics, and provides some tips and suggestions for readers who want to learn more about group theory in physics.


Wuki Tung's book has many strengths that make it a valuable resource for students and researchers who are interested in group theory in physics. Some of the strengths are:


- It covers a wide range of topics and applications of group theory in physics, from the basics to the advanced, from the classical to the quantum, from the discrete to the continuous, from the finite to the infinite. - It provides a clear and concise exposition of the concepts and methods of group theory, with many examples, exercises, and solutions. - It emphasizes the physical intuition and motivation behind group theory, rather than the mathematical rigor and abstraction. - It adopts a pedagogical approach that guides the reader from simple to complex, from concrete to abstract, from familiar to unfamiliar. - It uses a consistent notation and terminology that facilitates the understanding and communication of group theory. However, Wuki Tung's book also has some weaknesses that may limit its usefulness or accessibility for some readers. Some of the weaknesses are:


- It assumes a prior knowledge of basic mathematics and physics, such as linear algebra, calculus, complex analysis, quantum mechanics, atomic physics, molecular physics, solid state physics, particle physics, and relativity. - It does not provide a comprehensive or systematic treatment of some topics or aspects of group theory, such as abstract algebra, Lie groups, Lie algebras, representation theory of Lie groups, Young tableaux, projective representations, induced representations, etc. - It does not include some recent developments or applications of group theory in physics, such as topological phases of matter, quantum information theory, quantum gravity, etc. - It does not provide a detailed bibliography or references for further reading or research. Wuki Tung's book is one of the many books on group theory in physics that are available in the market. Some of the other books that are similar or complementary to his book are:


- "Group Theory and Its Application to Physical Problems" by Morton Hamermesh - "Group Theory in Physics: An Introduction" by John F. Cornwell - "Group Theory for Physicists" by Zhong-Qi Ma and Xiao-Yan Gu - "Group Theory: A Physicist's Survey" by Pierre Ramond - "Group Theory in Physics: Problems and Solutions" by Michael Aivazis Each of these books has its own advantages and disadvantages, depending on the level, style, scope, and focus of the author. Therefore, readers may benefit from consulting more than one book on group theory in physics to gain a broader and deeper perspective on the subject.


Finally, Wuki Tung's book provides some tips and suggestions for readers who want to learn more about group theory in physics. Some of the tips and suggestions are:


- Review the basic mathematics and physics that are relevant to group theory, such as linear algebra, calculus, complex analysis, quantum mechanics, atomic physics, molecular physics, solid state physics, particle physics, and relativity. exercises, and solutions. - Practice the exercises and problems that are given in the book or in other sources, and check your answers and solutions with the book or with other references. - Compare and contrast different books on group theory in physics, and try to understand the similarities and differences in their approaches and perspectives. - Explore and research some of the topics or applications of group theory in physics that are not covered or discussed in the book, and try to find some relevant sources or references for them. - Discuss and communicate with other students and researchers who are interested in group theory in physics, and try to exchange ideas and insights with them. Conclusion




In this article, we have reviewed Wuki Tung's book "Group Theory in Physics" in detail. We have summarized the main content and structure of his book, highlighted its strengths and weaknesses, compared it to other books on group theory in physics, and provided some tips and suggestions for readers who want to learn more about group theory in physics.


We hope that this article has helped you to appreciate the beauty and power of group theory in physics, and to understand how Wuki Tung's book can help you to learn and apply group theory in physics. We also hope that this article has inspired you to explore and discover more about group theory in physics, and to use it as a tool for advancing your knowledge and research in physics.


Thank you for reading this article. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact us. We would love to hear from you.


FAQs




Here are some frequently asked questions and answers related to the topic of this article.


Q: What is group theory?




A: Group theory is a branch of mathematics that studies the properties and patterns of abstract structures called groups. Groups are sets of elements that can be combined by a certain operation, such as addition or multiplication, that satisfies some rules.


Q: Why is group theory important in physics?




A: Group theory is important in physics because many physical systems and phenomena can be described or understood by using groups. For instance, the symmetry of a crystal or a molecule can be represented by a group, which tells us how the object looks the same after certain transformations, such as rotations or reflections. Similarly, the laws of nature can be expressed by using groups, which tell us how physical quantities, such as energy or momentum, change under certain transformations, such as rotations or boosts.


Q: Who is Wuki Tung and what is his contribution to group theory in physics?




A: Wuki Tung is a professor emeritus of physics at Purdue University. His contribution to group theory in physics is his book "Group Theory in Physics", which was first published in 1985 and has been widely used as a reference and a teaching material for graduate courses on group theory in physics. His book covers the basics of group theory, the representation theory of groups, and the applications of group theory in various fields of physics.


Q: What are some of the strengths and weaknesses of Wuki Tung's book?




A: Some of the strengths of Wuki Tung's book are:


- It covers a wide range of topics and applications of group theory in physics - It provides a clear and concise exposition of the concepts and methods of group theory - It emphasizes the physical intuition and motivation behind group theory - It adopts a pedagogical approach that guides the reader from simple to complex - It uses a consistent notation and terminology that facilitates the understanding and communication of group theory Some of the weaknesses of Wuki Tung's book are:


- It assumes a prior knowledge of basic mathematics and physics - It does not provide a comprehensive or systematic treatment of some topics or aspects of group theory - It does not include some recent developments or applications of group theory in physics - It does not provide a detailed bibliography or references for further reading or research Q: What are some other books on group theory in physics that are similar or complementary to Wuki Tung's book?




A: Some other books on group theory in physics that are similar or complementary to Wuki Tung's book are:


- "Group Theory and Its Application to Physical Problems" by Morton Hamermesh - "Group Theory in Physics: An Introduction" by John F. Cornwell - "Group Theory for Physicists" by Zhong-Qi Ma and Xiao-Yan Gu - "Group Theory: A Physicist's Survey" by Pierre Ramond - "Group Theory in Physics: Problems and Solutions" by Michael Aivazis 71b2f0854b


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