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Santiago Nguyen
Santiago Nguyen

BACKUP POWER



Despite performing the same function, battery backups and generators are different devices. Each one has a particular set of advantages and disadvantages, which we'll cover in the following comparison guide. Keep reading to find out about the main differences between battery backups and generators and decide which option is right for you.




BACKUP POWER



Home battery backup systems, such as the Tesla Powerwall or the LG Chem RESU, store energy, which you can use to power your house during an outage. Battery backups run on electricity, either from your home solar system or the electrical grid. As a result, they're much better for the environment than fuel-powered generators. They're also better for your wallet.


Separately, if you have a time-of-use utility plan, you can use a battery backup system to save money on your energy bills. Instead of paying high electricity rates during peak usage hours, you can use energy from your battery backup to power your home. In off-peak hours, you can use your electricity as normal -- but at a cheaper rate.


On the other hand, standby generators connect to your home's electrical panel and kick on automatically when the power goes out. Generators run on fuel to keep your electricity on during an outage -- typically natural gas, liquid propane or diesel. Other generators have a "dual fuel" feature, meaning that they can run on either natural gas or liquid propane.


With battery backups, you'll need to pay for the backup battery system upfront, as well as installation costs (each of which are in the thousands). Exact pricing will vary based on which battery model you choose and how many of them you need to power your home. However, it's common for an average-sized home battery backup system to run between $10,000 and $20,000.


Battery backups earn a slight edge in this category since they can be mounted to the wall or floor, whereas generator installations require a bit of additional work. Regardless, you'll need to hire a professional for either type of installation, both of which will require a full day of work and may cost several thousand dollars.


As far as how long they can keep your home powered, standby generators easily outperform battery backups. As long as you have enough fuel, generators can run continuously for up to three weeks at a time (if necessary).


That's simply not the case with battery backups. Let's use the Tesla Powerwall as an example. It has 13.5 kilowatt-hours of storage capacity, which can provide power for a few hours on its own. You can get extra power out of them if they're part of a solar panel system or if you use multiple batteries in a single system.


Over time, battery backup systems lose the ability to hold a charge, much like phones and laptops. For that reason, battery backups include an end-of-warranty capacity rating, which measures how effective a battery will hold a charge by the end of its warranty period. In Tesla's case, the company guarantees that the Powerwall battery should retain 70% of its capacity by the end of its 10-year warranty.


Across most categories, battery backup systems come out on top. In short, they're better for the environment, easier to install and cheaper to run long-term. Plus, they have longer warranties than standby generators.


With that said, traditional generators can be a good option in some cases. Unlike battery backups, you only need a single generator to restore power in an outage, which brings down the upfront costs. Plus, standby generators can last longer than battery backup systems in a single session. As a result, they'll be a safer bet if the power is out for days at a time.


Allows you to monitor the status of your generator from anywhere in the world using a smartphone, tablet, or PC. Easily access information, such as the current operating status and maintenance alerts. With Mobile Link, you are taken care of before the next power outage.


Generac has an online sizing calculator that can help you determine the right home backup generator for your unique needs. The best way, though, is to work with one of our 5000 dealers. They'll help you select the right generator, and provide you with a risk free quote.


Installing a home backup generator is an exciting time. Your installer will prepare the installation site outside your home, place the generator, run the natural gas or LP fuel line, install the transfer switch, and make all of the necessary electrical connections. And they will make sure that your backup generator runs properly, and is ready for its first power outage.


Generac home backup generators start at $1,949--the most cost-effective on the market. Installation costs vary by system size, installation considerations, and local building codes. We recommend getting a risk free quote from a Generac dealer near you.


The Wymans join a growing number of homeowners who are installing generators to guard against long or repeated power outages. Sales of residential units, which briefly spiked during the Y2K scare of the late 1990s, have been steadily increasing, helped in part by rolling blackouts in California, transistor-eating brownouts during summer heat waves, and the ever-present threat of a violent storm that might rip down power lines.


According to Ron Ford, a sales manager at Kohler, this calculation ensures that a generator will be big enough to cope with emergency power demand while running at to of its maximum load, which reduces fuel consumption and wear and tear on the engine (see image 2).


Most of our base systems can be customized by our factory in Costa Mesa, California to meet specific voltage, frequency, receptacle type, and power cord requirements. Our base systems come with maintenance free, valve regulated, sealed lead acid batteries, but we also offer optional long life lithium iron phosphate batteries upon request.


Need help? Let our engineers do all the work to ensure you find a system that will work with your equipment and meet your backup time requirements. Chat is available in the bottom right corner of this page, you may also Email engineering@batterybackuppower.com, or give us a Call at (855) 330-7799.


Customers are the most important part of any business. Ensuring that our customers get what they expect, are happy with their purchase, and have someone to talk to when questions come up is our main priority. Don't take our word for it, check out our reviews! Need help now? Call (855) 330-7799, Email engineering@batterybackuppower.com, or CHAT with us (bottom right hand corner).


Need protection from recurring loss of power? Would you like to expand and equip your business to accommodate more demanding uses of electricity? Backup Power Solutions is here to facilitate your will to establish a reliable power support system for nearly anything.


For more than 60 years, Myers Emergency Power Systems has designed, manufactured and advanced superior backup power solutions. Industry leaders across the emergency lighting, rail and transit, cable network and traffic markets turn to us when application failure is an unacceptable risk. Driven by an unwavering pursuit of perfected performance and reliability, we offer a wide array of products that deliver worry-free dependability. A former division of Myers Power Products, Myers Emergency Power Systems has evolved into a separate entity. This evolution allows us to bring forth even more focus and innovation as we continue to deliver best-in-class solutions to our customers around the world.


If you live in an area with frequent power outages, you already know the benefits of having a backup power supply for your home. Propane, diesel, and natural gas-powered generators have long been the system of choice for homeowners and businesses that want to ensure that the lights stay on when the power goes out in the neighborhood. Now, an increasing number of people are considering newer, cleaner battery options like the Tesla Powerwall.


Home battery backup power offers many of the same backup power functions as conventional generators but without the need for refueling. Read on for a comparison of battery backup options versus conventional generators, including a review of factors like cost, fuel supply, size, and maintenance.


By comparison, if you install a battery for backup power in your home, you can pair it with a solar energy system to charge it with renewable energy from the sun. This will add to your upfront cost (a smaller-than-average 6-kilowatt solar panel system will cost, on average, $16,560 before incentives), but over time it can save you tens of thousands of dollars on your electric bill.


By comparison, a home battery backup system runs on electricity and can be charged either from the grid or from a rooftop solar panel system. If you design a solar plus storage system for off-grid backup power, you can recharge when the grid goes down, adding an extra layer of security for situations where you might be worried about having access to fuel for a generator. (Not all home battery systems can be recharged during power outages, so make sure that your installer knows that this feature is crucial to you.)


An uninterruptible power supply or uninterruptible power source (UPS) is an electrical apparatus that provides emergency power to a load when the input power source or mains power fails. A UPS differs from an auxiliary or emergency power system or standby generator in that it will provide near-instantaneous protection from input power interruptions, by supplying energy stored in batteries, supercapacitors, or flywheels. The on-battery run-time of most uninterruptible power sources is relatively short (only a few minutes) but sufficient to start a standby power source or properly shut down the protected equipment. It is a type of continual power system.


A UPS is typically used to protect hardware such as computers, data centers, telecommunication equipment or other electrical equipment where an unexpected power disruption could cause injuries, fatalities, serious business disruption or data loss. UPS units range in size from ones designed to protect a single computer without a video monitor (around 200 volt-ampere rating) to large units powering entire data centers or buildings. The world's largest UPS, the 46-megawatt Battery Energy Storage System (BESS), in Fairbanks, Alaska, powers the entire city and nearby rural communities during outages.[1] 041b061a72


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